Defending suspects at police stations
Overview
Legal Action Group
criminal justice
Criminal Justice
‘It would be hard to overhype this book. Without a shadow of a doubt it is the Bible for police station advisers. If you do not have a copy go and get one now.’ policestationreps.com

‘It is difficult to believe that a solicitor with a criminal practice dare leave his office without this work.’ Justice of the Peace

‘Every legal representative called on to advise clients in police stations should have reference to it.’ JCWI Bulletin

Defending Suspects at Police Stations is the definitive guide for those advising detainees at the police station. It is an essential purchase for solicitors, duty solicitors, custody officers, criminal law students and in particular for those preparing for police station accreditation.

The author’s authoritative guidance is unrivalled. Comprehensive yet highly accessible and practical, Defending Suspects provides the answers to every day practical questions and problems. Initial chapters explain the basic principles of defending clients at the investigative stage and examine the key provisions of PACE and the Codes of Practice. Subsequent chapters tackle the various stages of advising a client including taking instructions, advising on ‘silence’, interview strategies, samples and searches, identification procedures and the charge decision. The book also includes dedicated chapters on advising and assisting vulnerable clients, on enforcement of the PACE and Code provisions, and on advising immigration detainees.
For this edition, Ed Cape is joined by Matthew Hardcastle and Sandra Paul of Kingsley Napley who bring years' of experience between them. Jawaid Luqmani of Luqmani, Thompson and Partners continues to provide his expertise in immigration law for chapter on immigration detainees.
The eighth edition provides coverage of:
the revised Codes of Practice – particularly Codes C and H, which were most recently revised in 2019
an up-to-date version of PACE, and the right to silence provisions of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, and links to the latest versions of the PACE Codes of Practice
the place of safety provisions of the amended Mental Health Act 1983
the latest codes, regulations and guidance issued by the Home Office, the College of Policing and the CPS
the latest case-law, including:
R v Johnson 2017, R v Lewis 2018, R v Green 2019 - the right to silence and prepared statements
Miller v DPP 2018, R v Beattie 2018, R v Ward 2018 – appropriate adults
R v Clarke 2018 and R v Hobbs 2018 – relevant factors in deciding whether to charge children
XX’s Application for Habeas Corpus 2019 – calculating the maximum period of detention without charge
Dixon v CPS 2018, Pegram v DPP 2019 – execution of duty
Parker v CC Essex Police 2017, CPM v MR 2019, Smith v CC of the Police Service of Northern Ireland 2019 – arrest
R v E 2018 – obligation to pursue lines of enquiry
Director of the SFO v Eurasian Natural Resources Corp Ltd 2018 – privilege
R v Price 2018 – impact of admission of guilt at police station on sentence
R (Lowden) v Gateshead MC 2016, R (SY) v DPP 2018 – out-of-court disposals
Defending Suspects at Police Stations is supported by a dedicated website on which the authors will post latest legal changes, cases and guidance, and bi-annual police station updates in Legal Action.

About the author

Description: Ed Cape - author
Ed Cape is Emeritus Professor of Criminal Law and Practice at the University of the West of England.